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Ben Гs Ed



Benjamin Ginsberg is the David Bernstein Professor of Political Science and Chair of the Hopkins Center for Advanced Governmental Studies in Washington, D.C. His research interests include American politics, Jewish history, higher education policy, and the societal impact of war and violence. He is the author, coauthor or editor of 29 books and is currently working on a survey-based study of the ways in which competing political forces seek to manipulate history and re-predict the future entitled, "Warping Time".




Ben Г©s Ed



"Can We Halt Administrative Bloat?" Minding the Campus, Feb. 10, 2014.131.. "Christian Zionism," in Eunice Pollack, ed., Anti-Semitism in the English-Speaking World, Academic Studies Press, forthcoming in 2014.132. "The Civic Distance Between Rulers and Ruled," co-authored with Jennifer Bachner, 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Assn., September, 2014.


"Impeachment, Quasi-Impeachment and Institutional Power," (co-authored with Martin Shefter) in Richard Ellis and Michael Nelson, eds., Debating the Presidency, Congressional Quarterly Press, 2006.


"Citizens as Customers in the New Administrative System" (co-authored with Matthew Crenson), prepared for the National Academy of Public Administration conference on government management, Washington, DC, June, 2001. Published in Benjamin Ginsberg and Thomas Stanton (eds.), Making Government Manageable Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003.


Review of A Rumor About the Jews: Reflections on Antisemitism and the Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion, Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 2001.


"Dilemmas of Jewish Leadership in America," presented to the Solomon Project conference on Jews in America, Washington, D.C., May 15, 2000 and published in L. Sandy Maisel (ed.) Jews in America, Rowman & Littlefield, 2001.


"Politics Without Participation," co-authored with Matthew Crenson, prepared for the Fordham University Forum on American Politics, Bronx, New York, November, 1999 and published in Paul Kantor, et.al.(eds.) American Politics at the Millennium: Political Parties and the Future of Democracy, Congressional Quarterly Press, 2001.


"Dilemmas of Presidential Governance," co-authored with Walter Mebane and Martin Shefter in Michael Nelson (ed.), The Presidency and the Political System, Fifth edition, Congressional Quarterly Press, 1998. Revised for Sixth edition, 2000.


"Why Presidents Cannot Govern: Politics and Power in Contemporary America," co-authored with Martin Shefter and Walter Mebane in Michael Nelson (ed.), The Presidency and the Political System, Fourth Edition, Congressional Quarterly Press, 1994.


"The Changing Relationship Between Conflict and Mobilization in American Politics," co- authored with Walter Mebane and Martin Shefter, presented to the 1993, annual meeting of the Social Science History Association, Baltimore, MD, November, 1993.


"The Disjunction Between Conflict and Mobilization in Contemporary America," co-authored with Walter Mebane and Martin Shefter, presented to the 1993 annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Washington, D.C., September, 1993.


"Elections and Voting Behavior," in Joel Krieger (ed.), The Oxford Companion to Politics of the World, Oxford University Press. 1992. Revised for second edition, 2000. Revised for third edition, 2010.


"The Presidency and Social Forces: Creating a Republican Coalition," co-authored with Martin Shefter in Michael Nelson (ed.), The Presidency and the Political System, Third Edition, Congressional Quarterly Press, 1990.


"Electoral Decay and the Power of the American State," co-authored with Martin Shefter in Benjamin Ginsberg and Alan Stone (eds.), Do Elections Matter?, Second Edition, M.E. Sharpe Publishers, 1990.


"After the Reagan Revolution: Toward A Post-Electoral Politics?" co-authored with Martin Shefter in Lawrence Berman (ed.), Looking Back on the Reagan Presidency, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1990.


"Political Parties, Electoral Politics and Institutional Conflict," co-authored with Martin Shefter, presented to the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Washington, D.C., September, 1988.


"Toward a Post-electoral Politics?" co-authored with Martin Shefter, presented to the "Legacy of the Reagan Presidency," conference, Institute of Governmental Affairs, University of California, Davis, CA, May, 1988.


"The Presidency and the Organization of Interests: From the New Deal to Ronald Reagan," co-authored with Martin Shefter, in Michael Nelson (ed.), The Presidency and the Political System, Second Edition, Congressional Quarterly Press, 1987.


"Institutional Realism and Institutional Conflict: The Iran-Contra Case," co-authored with Martin Shefter, presented to the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Chicago, IL, September, 1987.


"Primary Elections and the Evanescence of Third Party Activity in the United States," co-authored with Peter Galderisi, in Ginsberg and Stone (eds.), Do Elections Matter? M. E. Sharpe Publishers, 1986.


"Why Reaganism Will be With Us into the 21st Century," co-authored with Martin Shefter in The Washington Post.Sunday, September 15, 1985. Reprinted in The Washington Post, National Weekly Edition, September 30, 1985. Reprinted in Bruce Stinebrickner (ed.) American Government, Dushkin Publishing, 1989. Reprinted in William Grover and Joseph Peschek, Voices of Dissent, HarperCollins Publishers, 1992.


"Standing the New Deal on its Head: Ronald Reagan and the Reconstitution of American Politics," co-authored with Martin Shefter, presented to the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, New Orleans, LA, September, 1985.


"A Critical Realignment? The New Politics the Reconstituted Right and the 1984 Election," co-authored with Martin Shefter, in Michael Nelson (ed.), The Elections of 1984, Congressional Quarterly Press, 1985.


"Money and Power. The New Political Economy of American Elections," in Thomas Ferguson and Joel Rogers (eds.), The Political Economy: Readings in the Politics and Economics of American Public Policy, M. E. Sharpe Publishers, 1984.


"The Government of Opinion: Beyond 1984," theme paper for "The Structure of Political Thinking" section of the 1984 annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Washington, D. C., September, 1984.


"The International Political Economy, Domestic Alignments, and the 1984 Election," co-authored with Martin Shefter, presented to the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Washington, D.C., September, 1984.


"Irresponsible Parties, Responsible Party Systems," co-authored with Peter S. Galderisi, presented to the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Washington, D.C., September, 1977.


"The Impact of the Direct Primary on Party Systems," co-authored with Peter S. Galderisi, presented to the annual meeting of the Social Science History Association, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October, 1976.


Private donor and foundation funding for the Johns Hopkins Washington Center, 1993 to present. George E. Owen Award for outstanding teaching and service, presented at commencement by the Class of 2000, Johns Hopkins University, June, 2000.


On most dimensions the U.S. economy appears to be performing well. Output growth has returned to healthy levels, the labor market is firming, and inflation appears to be well controlled. However, one aspect of U.S. economic performance still evokes concern among economists and policymakers: the nation's large and growing current account deficit. In the first three quarters of 2004, the U.S. external deficit stood at $635 billion at an annual rate, or about 5-1/2 percent of the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP). Corresponding to that deficit, U.S. citizens, businesses, and governments on net had to raise $635 billion on international capital markets.1 The current account deficit has been on a steep upward trajectory in recent years, rising from a relatively modest $120 billion (1.5 percent of GDP) in 1996 to $414 billion (4.2 percent of GDP) in 2000 on its way to its current level. Most forecasters expect the nation's current account imbalance to decline slowly at best, implying a continued need for foreign credit and a concomitant decline in the U.S. net foreign asset position.


Why is the United States, with the world's largest economy, borrowing heavily on international capital markets--rather than lending, as would seem more natural? What implications do the U.S. current account deficit and our consequent reliance on foreign credit have for economic performance in the United States and in our trading partners? What policies, if any, should be used to address this situation? In my remarks today I will offer some tentative answers to these questions. My answers will be somewhat unconventional in that I will take issue with the common view that the recent deterioration in the U.S. current account primarily reflects economic policies and other economic developments within the United States itself. Although domestic developments have certainly played a role, I will argue that a satisfying explanation of the recent upward climb of the U.S. current account deficit requires a global perspective that more fully takes into account events outside the United States. To be more specific, I will argue that over the past decade a combination of diverse forces has created a significant increase in the global supply of saving--a global saving glut--which helps to explain both the increase in the U.S. current account deficit and the relatively low level of long-term real interest rates in the world today. The prospect of dramatic increases in the ratio of retirees to workers in a number of major industrial economies is one important reason for the high level of global saving. However, as I will discuss, a particularly interesting aspect of the global saving glut has been a remarkable reversal in the flows of credit to developing and emerging-market economies, a shift that has transformed those economies from borrowers on international capital markets to large net lenders. 041b061a72


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